Briefing Room: Know Your Enemy

As this is written, a point of contention for journalists and the general public is the fact that people in the White House—from the President to press secretaries—won’t use the word “Islamic” when describing terrorists. The term used is “radical extremists.”

I suppose the reason for such political correctness is not wanting to offend peaceful persons who happen to be Muslims. However, I think the fact that we are not at war with peaceful Muslims goes without saying.

Let’s examine this a bit further. Presently, the two biggest threats to our security are the group known as ISIS and the nation of Iran. ISIS is an acronym for Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. The official name for Iran is the Islamic Republic of Iran.

I’m surely not as smart as those leading our great nation, but since our enemies use “Islamic” in their very names, I don’t see why calling them Islamic extremists or Islamic terrorists is a bad thing.

The simple, brutal fact is that we are at war with people who want to kill small children, rape, torture, behead, burn people alive, and have sworn to wipe the “Small Satan” and “Large Satan” [Israel and the United States] from the face of the Earth.”

And the White House only wants to refer to them as “radical.” I guess it should not come as a huge surprise, since this is the same Administration that changed the name of the Global War on Terror to Overseas Contingency Operation.

Back in the day, law enforcement officers were dispatched to a “family fight.” Now they are dispatched to a “domestic dispute.” The term is so mild it’s almost pleasant, and does not accurately describe what’s going on—a fight! Rather it sounds like a butler and maid negotiating a pay raise.

In the interest of being PC, not calling a spade a spade can get people injured—or killed.

In The Art of War, Sun Tzu said, “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

Those words resonate as much today as they did when they were written 2,500 years ago. I hope our leaders don’t fall into that last category.

Until next time, stay low and watch your back.

(sig)

Discussion
  • (will not be published)

No Comments