First position is High Kneeling shooting over simulated cover.

CHAIR QUAL: Barricade Skills Using a Folding Chair

In many carbine classes, shooters are shown several ways to adapt their long gun to cover to make a mid-range hit. This is often exposure only without a great way to measure or track performance and subsequently carbineros do not sustain those capabilities to a high degree. One of the big reasons for this is

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Third handicap is to offset the hands by platform. Strong hand gets the back-up gun, like this vintage Colt Detective Special. Support side gets the full-size piece. Splatters on Noner target show impacts from Black Hills wadcutters from single shots at distance under time pressure.

CHALLENGE YOURSELF TO A SHOOT-OFF Single-Handed Skills

From the earliest days of the handgun, the weapon was primarily fired with a single hand. In retrospect, it is downright curious how little emphasis was placed on two-handed shooting as anything other than a last-resort contingency if the target were galloping away over the next ridgeline. Training manuals from as late as the muscle-car

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FIVE-YARD ROUNDUP: Timed Close-Up Shooting Drill

As I work with different groups of shooters and organizations, I routinely see a significant training gap: solid hits under realistic time pressure at relatively close range. A compelling body of evidence from anecdotal as well as organizational studies shows that the fight is likely to happen with the interested parties separated only by a few steps.

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Home on the Range: Drills to Maintain Skill Sets

The necessity of constant and consistent handgun practice cannot be overemphasized. These are perishable skill sets that deteriorate with time. Take a 25-year-old fairly athletic male who yearns to be a body builder. He follows the appropriate dietary schedule and works out vigorously. After a year of this intense training, he has attained the physique

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Group Therapy: Get Your Shots Under Control

One of my favorite drills to start a training session is a prone, slow-fire, five- to ten-round group on an NRA B-8 bullseye at 100 yards. First, it checks or confirms that a rifle is still zeroed, as zeroes can drift over time due to a variety of factors including weather changes and impacts to the weapon or sights.

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$300 Shootout: Testing Bargain Blasters

Poking around the Internet, a new shooter stands a high probability of coming away with one of two impressions. First that he or she is best off with a 1911, but only certain makes and models will do, and those only after sending it off for sundry modifications and reliability work.

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Malfunction Reduction: Stay in the Fight! Part 2

In the January issue, we looked at Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 malfunctions. This month we’ll examine some less common—but more perplexing—malfunctions. As stated before, this is not “the” way—it is “a” way. But understand this: If you use or train to use the weapon as a weapon and not a hobby item, you need to be able to clear malfunctions efficiently.

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