FIVE-YARD ROUNDUP: Timed Close-Up Shooting Drill

As I work with different groups of shooters and organizations, I routinely see a significant training gap: solid hits under realistic time pressure at relatively close range. A compelling body of evidence from anecdotal as well as organizational studies shows that the fight is likely to happen with the interested parties separated only by a few steps.

Home on the Range: Drills to Maintain Skill Sets

The necessity of constant and consistent handgun practice cannot be overemphasized. These are perishable skill sets that deteriorate with time. Take a 25-year-old fairly athletic male who yearns to be a body builder. He follows the appropriate dietary schedule and works out vigorously. After a year of this intense training, he has attained the physique

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Group Therapy: Get Your Shots Under Control

One of my favorite drills to start a training session is a prone, slow-fire, five- to ten-round group on an NRA B-8 bullseye at 100 yards. First, it checks or confirms that a rifle is still zeroed, as zeroes can drift over time due to a variety of factors including weather changes and impacts to the weapon or sights.

$300 Shootout: Testing Bargain Blasters

Poking around the Internet, a new shooter stands a high probability of coming away with one of two impressions. First that he or she is best off with a 1911, but only certain makes and models will do, and those only after sending it off for sundry modifications and reliability work.

Malfunction Reduction: Stay in the Fight! Part 2

In the January issue, we looked at Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 malfunctions. This month we’ll examine some less common—but more perplexing—malfunctions. As stated before, this is not “the” way—it is “a” way. But understand this: If you use or train to use the weapon as a weapon and not a hobby item, you need to be able to clear malfunctions efficiently.

Ten-Shot Qual Course: Budget Shooting-Performance Test

I wanted a course of fire that was quick and easy to conduct and minimized ammo outlay. This indicated a single-target drill. My experience has been that some two- and three-target drills—which are my personal favorites—quickly become “too hard” to administer for groups and are not used as often as simpler single-target drills.

Malfunction Reduction: Stay in the Fight! Part I

A malfunction is a stoppage in the cycle of operations. This stoppage can take many different paths, and we codify each one and break them into two broad categories: those that can be reduced with Immediate Action and those requiring Remedial Action.

Wheelgun Wisdom: Running Double-Action Revolvers

Recently I had the privilege of instructing the “revolver day” of a New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy’s Firearms Instructor Course. Fourteen cops were in the class, and experience ranged from a few years to one gent with 27 years in the bag…

Rediscovering the Wheel: Revolver Drills To Improve Shooting

Many shooters who have come into the community in the last decade view the service revolver as a throwback one-half step ahead of cowboy action shooting. Others view it very specifically as a pocket and/or ankle gun à la the five-shot J-Frame.