Malfunction Reduction: Stay in the Fight! Part 2

In the January issue, we looked at Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 malfunctions. This month we’ll examine some less common—but more perplexing—malfunctions. As stated before, this is not “the” way—it is “a” way. But understand this: If you use or train to use the weapon as a weapon and not a hobby item, you need to be able to clear malfunctions efficiently.

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Malfunction Reduction: Stay in the Fight! Part I

A malfunction is a stoppage in the cycle of operations. This stoppage can take many different paths, and we codify each one and break them into two broad categories: those that can be reduced with Immediate Action and those requiring Remedial Action.

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Rangemaster on the Road: Instructor Development Class

When it comes to defensive firearm training geared specifically toward private citizens, I feel confident in stating that Tom Givens is one of the best instructors in the U.S. I can say this because I have been in his class, and because he has had over 60 of his non-LEO students prevail in shooting encounters with criminals.

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Breacher Up: Alexander Global Strategies Breaching Class

For a majority of police and military units, forced entry and door breaching during tactical operations have long been afterthoughts. Too often they are considered pregame warm-ups for the main event: the actual entry into a structure to neutralize bad guys and rescue hostages.

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Call to Arms: Defending Home, Community and Country

If you are reading this article, in this magazine, you are probably in some manner familiar with guns. Maybe a little, or maybe a lot. But the great majority of people believe that no matter what happens, someone will come to save you! After all, isn’t that the job of the police and fire departments? And if injured, EMS will provide pre-hospital care for you. All you have to do is exist.

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The Weaver Stance: Combating the Misinformation

The Weaver stance is well-known, acknowledged as revolutionary, and quick to draw sidelong glances from more than a few people on the firing line lately. In fact, a surefire way to start a heated argument is to debate the merits of the Weaver versus the “Isosceles” or other shooting positions.

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