Frontline Debriefs: Witness Interviews

Individuals who are neither police nor military have their own unique perception and interpretation of events. This is especially true when such individuals have witnessed an officer-involved shooting (OIS). Bear in mind that these individuals have never been exposed to deadly force events save those depicted on the big or small screen. The following are

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Frontline Debriefs: Back-Ups

The rationale behind a recent growing trend simply escapes me. On a number of OIS cases I’ve worked over the past few years, officers were not carrying back-up guns. I’ve seen this multiple times, not just once or twice. The excuses may run the gamut: It’s too bulky, too heavy, too uncomfortable, too bothersome, too

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Frontline Debriefs: Bad Advice

Bad advice is replete throughout the shooting industry. I caution individuals not to adhere to advice rendered by those not qualified to do so. This would seem to follow along the lines of common sense in just about any profession one could envision. Yet it does not seem to be the case when it comes

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Frontline Debriefs: The Cost of Training

Not too long ago, I conducted training for a police group while a different police group trained on an adjacent range. Several officers from the other group watched our training for a period of time. “Hey, can we do that too?” they queried. “Absolutely,” I responded. When I explained that they would have to contact

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Frontline Debriefs: The Low Ready Position

I was taken to task on the internet some time ago for advocating the low ready position. To paraphrase: “I would not listen to anyone who advocates the low ready position…” Wow! I love these guys. First, this was posted under a pseudonym. On the internet you are cloaked in anonymity, which is pretty much

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Frontline Debriefs: Contagion Fire

The subject of contagion fire arises from opposing attorneys in officer-involved shooting (OIS) cases wherein a number of officers fire a number of rounds at any given suspect. When first introduced to this terminology, I was somewhat miffed. Here again was the opposing so-called “expert” referring to “contagion fire” as if it were written in

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Frontline Debriefs: Emotion and Deadly Force

My wife, Brett, and I attended a movie the other night. It was a movie of her choice—which is to say it was not the Dirty Dozen or a Steve McQueen flick. As soon as the movie started, the individuals behind us began to speak and the moron directly behind me kept bumping my seat

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Frontline Debriefs: Active Shooters

The active shooter is a relatively new phenomenon in the grand scheme of things. In the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s, this scenario did not occur with the frequency or violence of today. From Sandy Hook, Aurora and the very recent LAX shootings, one can clearly observe that this phenomenon is here to stay. Motivations for

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Frontline Debriefs: Excessive Shots

Excessive rounds in the field can be problematic. First and foremost is the fact that in most cases the more rounds fired, the less hits realized. This may be the result of flawed training. I am aware of certain courses of fire where instructors have taught students to empty magazines into targets. If you respond

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Frontline Debriefs: Has “A” Way Become “The” Way?

For many individuals, as well as for many agencies, “a” way to do something becomes “the” way to do it—the only way. Once we learn something and really adopt it as our own, it can be difficult to change. This is particularly true at law enforcement agencies. One generation of instructors selects the next generation

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