Training and Tactics: The Close-Quarters Conundrum

Close-quarters gunfighting is much like boxing. As long as your opponent doesn’t bob, weave, duck, and/or slip your punches, he’s easy to hit. And since point blank—correctly defined—could be literally hundreds of meters, and contact distance—correctly defined—means halitosis distance, for the purpose of this article, “close quarters” is being referenced as the “generic” six-to-ten-foot gunfight.

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Training and Tactics: Twenty-One Feet Is Not Enough

There are two definitions of feet. One is the plural form of an ambulatory organ; the other is a measure of distance. And in a typical physical-force confrontation, you need both to win. Without utilizing the former, you can’t strategically gain the latter. Unfortunately, circumstances often dictate that you can’t stabilize in a solid firing

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Training and Tactics: Holy Sights, Batman!

Bats generally veer to the left when they exit their caves. But that doesn’t mean you bet your life on it when a swarm of vampire bats go out to dinner and you’re the closest entree. Similarly, “new and improved” pistol sight systems may not be all they’re touted to be—or applicable or effective for

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Training and Tactics: Episode of Enlightenment

For me, it happened about 20 years ago. Older readers of this column will remember a similar experience, when you had an epiphany and realized that you weren’t the only latent brain surgeon who had ever walked on this planet. And it manifested itself about ten years after your imbecilic father apparently swallowed an encyclopedia

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Training and Tactics: Don’t Be A Zero When You Zero

Zero can mean nothing. Or it can mean everything, relative to the point-of-impact precision desired by a shootist. Obviously firearms with adjustable sighting systems—especially those with non-factory aftermarket additions like telescopic sights and red dot optics—have to be battle-zeroed before being used in any for-real confrontation. Otherwise the operator will have no concept of the

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Training and Tactics: Shot But Not Stopped

Many people are already familiar with the legend of Death Under The Desert Sun. The incident occurred several years ago in Arizona, and, like many legends, has grown in size with each recounting of the tale—thanks in part to the self-aggrandizing anecdotes of the hero and chief raconteur of the incident. For the three remaining

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Training and Tactics: Storm On The Horizon

Until relatively recent times, duels of honor were invariably preceded by the words “Gentlemen, choose your weapons.” Today, the statement is still valid, but is more applicable to a different situation: that of being prepared as dark clouds once again loom on the horizon. And since Man’s propensity for self-destruction hasn’t waned in 5,000 years,

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Training and Tactics: Lube Job

Don’t sweat the small stuff. Or that’s what we are commonly told, anyway. Unfortunately, it’s often the “small stuff” that causes a defensive pistol to malfunction at the most inopportune of times. Like in a gunfight. When you’re taking incoming rounds. As in not having the capability to return fire. And you don’t have a

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Training and Tactics: The Myth of Muscle Memory

There are a lot of hackneyed phrases floating around out there these days. One of them is, if you practice garbage, after 20 years you’ll end up with perfected garbage. The antithesis to this is, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. And both have validity. Unfortunately, what Robert the Bruce learned from

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