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As it turns out, “3” is Reed Knight III, or Trey as he’s more commonly known, and is the son of the owner and founder of Knight’s Armament Company (KAC), located in Titusville, Florida.

Right side of KAC SR15-E3 carbine as outfited by author for class

Knight’s Armament should need no introduction to recent veterans or aficionados of the platform, as it is the maker of the railed forend found on current issue U.S. Army M4s and USMC M16s.

Knight’s was the originator of the railed forend and is still the current supplier to the military, having sold over 500,000 to the U.S. government.

Trey was a man on a mission—to announce and promote Knight’s revived interest in the commercial firearms market. Trey had his work cut out for him, as over the years Knight’s has gained a reputation for turning a somewhat cold shoulder to the commercial firearms and accessories market. Fans of Knight’s will tell you that this was due to their being overwhelmed with military orders, while detractors say that they “just didn’t care.” Whatever the case, Trey was, and is, setting out to change that perception and was also announcing the commercial release of the new Knight’s Armament SR-15 E3, Knight’s newest version of the AR-15 carbine.

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This column is about ladies, but it is addressed to the guys. Here is our vital public service message of the month: Stop buying things for women. Actually, you can continue purchasing chocolate, flowers, birthday cards, jewelry, fancy soap for the guest bathroom, and all the other stuff that women typically enjoy (and men pretty much hate), but we really need to stop buying them firearms and hunting accessories. This advice is based upon the opinion of pretty much every…

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One of the interesting and wholly unanticipated side effects of the presidential election is that demand for firearms training has increased rather than decreased. Most industry insiders had predicted things would quiet down now that most of our federal leadership isn’t using the phrase “Second Amendment” as a vile personal insult. In spite of expectations, instructors and schools are seeing near-record levels of people seeking training, a welcome but somewhat puzzling situation. Some of the demand is ironically coming from…

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You can dress a pig in a sweatsuit, but that doesn’t make him an Olympic athlete. And you can attend a ten-day defensive firearms course, but that doesn’t make you a gunfighter. It may make you adept in the fields of weapon manipulation and accuracy with a specific firearm. You may even walk out of there with a modicum of strategy and tactics—but it’s not the same as retaliatory defensive shooting when under attack for real. Defensive shooting, by nature,…

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A lot of hackneyed phrases are floating around out there. One of them is, if you practice garbage, after 20 years you’ll end up with perfected garbage. The antithesis of this is, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Both have validity. Unfortunately, what Robert the Bruce learned from watching a persistent spider while hiding in a cave may not apply to the struggling pistolero. When you’re battling to hit the target on a firing range, it doesn’t…

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Most school attendees have an innate dislike of mathematics. Unless looking toward a future vocation directly involving the applied use of math, the majority of pupils usually voice sentiments along the lines of, “When am I ever going to use this garbage when I become the World Skateboard Champion?”

Then years later, you realize retrospectively that you subconsciously use mathematics—especially geometry—every day of your life. Estimating passing distances while driving, or when the 40-foot-tree crunches ten feet of your house roof because you failed to correctly measure the 30-foot intervening space while testing that Horsepower from Hell chain saw, or when trying to outrun a tornado because you figure your self-invented Pythagass Theorem gives better odds than picking a trifecta at a race track.

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One of my favorite tactical adages is the old “Don’t put the cart before the horse.” What does this proverbial old chestnut have to do with close-range interpersonal violence? Simple, really: In any multi-step process or procedure, we often take the individual segments out of sequence because of the natural tendency to focus on the enjoyable or perhaps more difficult tasks rather than just doing things in the proper order.

The example I’m thinking about today is pistol presentation, i.e., “drawing the gun.” When teaching novices how to fight with a handgun, we always start with the proper presentation. Almost without exception, students give that block of instruction a courtesy nod while obviously thinking, “Yeah, I know it’s important, but when do we get to shoot?”

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Recently, on a working vacation with the family, we watched a movie wherein the hero traveled to the center of the earth in order to save it. Now being the curious sort, I figured out the degree of plausibility of such an endeavor. Here it is:

The earth’s core is estimated to run at a balmy 10,800 degrees Fahrenheit. Titanium melts at 3,034 degrees Fahrenheit. The pressure at the core is estimated to run in the neighborhood of around 3.6 million atmospheres. Since the core is solid nickel/iron, this equates to about 13,000 kilograms of pressure per cubic meter. In short, any crew in any vessel in this situation would be squashed and toasted beyond all recognition. Hollywood screenwriting magic, folks!

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