Bug In: Streetwise Supplies For In-Place Survival

Teddy Roosevelt’s candor was good for many quotes, and one of my favorites is his advice to “do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” The “what you have” part can be influenced in advance by planning and preparation. But the uncomfortable reality of having to do what you can “where you

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The Cutting Edge: Toolbox Tomahawks

Since Paleolithic times and into the Bronze Age, small axes were one of the most valued tools. A hafted tool stores energy as it is swung, and if it has an edge, that energy transfers to a concentrated spot on the work-piece and can accomplish a lot. As we are wont to do, man usually

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The Cutting Edge: KA-BAR Becker Combat Bowie

When building a long, point-heavy knife, there are several things the designer has to get just right or he’ll end up with a chopping-only implement with built-in limitations. Few really worthwhile “do-it-all” features get added to knives, and when a knife comes along that does more than one thing very well without them, it usually reflects that the evolutionary stages were worked out by a designer who was also an experienced end-user.

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Tree Treats: Free Food From The Forest

When we consider our forebears’ traditional harvest resources, we see that common trees are a cornucopia of good food that’s free for the taking. Trees have always supplied essential good things to eat, from fruits to nuts, but the tree itself can supply wholesome—and tasty—sustenance to more than beavers. Few people chew on tree parts

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Food on the Run: Making Use Of Nature’s Market

Teddy Roosevelt advised, “Do the best you can, with what you have, where you are.” Excellent advice when foraging food in a survival situation, because the real life hunter-gatherer has always been more of a gatherer-hunter—it’s just that the hunting and fishing part is more fun. Some aboriginal Americans raised corn, squash and beans, but

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