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As it turns out, “3” is Reed Knight III, or Trey as he’s more commonly known, and is the son of the owner and founder of Knight’s Armament Company (KAC), located in Titusville, Florida.

Right side of KAC SR15-E3 carbine as outfited by author for class

Knight’s Armament should need no introduction to recent veterans or aficionados of the platform, as it is the maker of the railed forend found on current issue U.S. Army M4s and USMC M16s.

Knight’s was the originator of the railed forend and is still the current supplier to the military, having sold over 500,000 to the U.S. government.

Trey was a man on a mission—to announce and promote Knight’s revived interest in the commercial firearms market. Trey had his work cut out for him, as over the years Knight’s has gained a reputation for turning a somewhat cold shoulder to the commercial firearms and accessories market. Fans of Knight’s will tell you that this was due to their being overwhelmed with military orders, while detractors say that they “just didn’t care.” Whatever the case, Trey was, and is, setting out to change that perception and was also announcing the commercial release of the new Knight’s Armament SR-15 E3, Knight’s newest version of the AR-15 carbine.

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I own guns. I’ve had some decent training, but it was a while back. I don’t practice frequently. When I do, it tends to be with a favored few firearms. I haven’t rehearsed clearing a room or firing while “moving in a highly dynamic manner” in ages. Nor do I regularly practice things like shooting with partially obscured vision or slippery hands. According to certain persons (self-styled experts), this makes me an “irresponsible and incompetent” gun owner. Now, don’t get…

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It took a long time spent carrying a gun and a badge for me to figure out the secret of reaching that state of “conscious competence” regarding tactical operations: admit your mistakes. This came to mind today when another officer wanted to meet me immediately following a burglary-in-progress run. I had arrived within a minute of the call and took up a position to wait for backup. As the previous shift had started with a serious stabbing on what was…

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Just look at you—packing a great gun, been to dozens of classes, got a highly tactical backpack covered in cool morale patches and, best of all, you really know how to “talk the talk.” But I wonder: Can you “do it”? Get your mind out of the gutter. I mean, do you possess the internal fortitude to commit violent and wholly unpleasant acts upon an adversary who means you serious bodily harm or death? I know the answer: “Of course!”…

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John Filippidis and his family were returning from a Christmas celebration in New Jersey. Headed home to Florida on New Years Eve 2013, they had no reason to expect trouble. Shortly after entering Maryland on I-95, Filippidis spotted a Transportation Authority patrol car in the rearview mirror. Next thing he knew, he was being questioned by a hostile officer who was only interested in one thing: “Where’s the gun?” The gun, a Kel-Tec .380, was in a safe in Florida,…

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Necessity may well be the mother of invention, but sometimes she breeds a bastard child.

Unlike the Industrial Revolution, which fostered ingenious mechanical designs without a follow-up of mental deficiency, the computer age has sometimes led to a “better way” of doing things, but with an attendant loss of brainpower. Much like someone who is slightly physically impaired, the constant unnecessary use of a crutch can—and will—eventually lead to the inability to operate without that crutch.

So it is with many of the appendage crutches bolted on to many modern shootists’ firearms—specifically sighting systems. And while the subjects of vision “failure” and sighting systems have been flogged ad nauseam by this author since 1994 (instigated by a personal case of vision loss resulting from a bout of encephalitis), it is now 20 years later and my vision for the last 16 years ago has been, and is, 20/15 on a bad day in poor light.

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Mike Vanderboegh is a smuggler. With a difference.

Joe Average smuggler hopes government officials won’t notice what he’s up to. Mike, on the other hand, wants them to notice. In fact, he smuggles some of his goods right into their offices.

If you hang around the gun-rights movement, you probably know Mike, at least by reputation. He blogs at Sipsey Street Irregulars. He’s the founder and rabble-rouser-in-chief of the Three Percent movement. (“Threepers” being the small but powerful portion of the citizenry who will eventually be willing and able to shoot tyrants.) With his friend David Codrea and brave whistleblowers, he was responsible for bringing the ATF’s Fast & Furious “gunwalking” scandal to light.

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Doorways and entrances have long been colloquially known as “the fatal funnel.” From a strategic perspective, once you are trapped—or choose to remain stationary within the confines of a portal—you become the proverbial potential Roach Motel guest. You may well check in and not check out.

One of the absolute worst versions of this problem is the automobile door and door-well layout. One can’t really fight if entrapped by close quarters inside the vehicle. You’re hampered if you can’t exit and you’re blocked by equipment and mechanical structures if you’re jammed in the actual portal itself.

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