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As it turns out, “3” is Reed Knight III, or Trey as he’s more commonly known, and is the son of the owner and founder of Knight’s Armament Company (KAC), located in Titusville, Florida.

Right side of KAC SR15-E3 carbine as outfited by author for class

Knight’s Armament should need no introduction to recent veterans or aficionados of the platform, as it is the maker of the railed forend found on current issue U.S. Army M4s and USMC M16s.

Knight’s was the originator of the railed forend and is still the current supplier to the military, having sold over 500,000 to the U.S. government.

Trey was a man on a mission—to announce and promote Knight’s revived interest in the commercial firearms market. Trey had his work cut out for him, as over the years Knight’s has gained a reputation for turning a somewhat cold shoulder to the commercial firearms and accessories market. Fans of Knight’s will tell you that this was due to their being overwhelmed with military orders, while detractors say that they “just didn’t care.” Whatever the case, Trey was, and is, setting out to change that perception and was also announcing the commercial release of the new Knight’s Armament SR-15 E3, Knight’s newest version of the AR-15 carbine.

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The mind boggles. A recent “news” article claimed that so-called sovereign citizens may now be the most dangerous potential terrorist threat in the United States. Sovereign citizens? Those guys who refuse to license their vehicles or themselves? Those guys who get bothered when a courtroom flag has gold fringe? Those guys who believe that if they don’t allow their name to be written in all caps, the federal government can’t control them? Those throwbacks to the 1990s? Those people who…

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Almost 30 years ago, my wife and I were visited by her then 66-year-old father. As a young Marine, he had served in the Pacific in World War II. Among his decorations were a Navy Cross, Silver Star, and Purple Heart. On the second day of his visit, he asked me if I would take him shooting, telling me he had brought his pistol with him on the bus and he needed some practice. His once nice neighborhood in Southern…

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I am the bullet—and I have no conscience. You will treat me with respect because, once I leave, you have no control over my actions. Once I’m gone, I will do as I please, governed only by the laws of physics. And the next time you see me, I will have done my work, bringing on your life a potential gamut of emotions ranging from pleasure, satisfaction and exhilaration to anger, pain, grief and regret. Use me wisely and with…

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I was taken to task on the internet some time ago for advocating the low ready position. To paraphrase: “I would not listen to anyone who advocates the low ready position….” Wow! I love these guys. First, this was posted under a pseudonym. On the internet you are cloaked in anonymity, which is pretty much like yelling at someone and then hiding behind your mother’s skirt. Low ready is both viable and eminently applicable in field settings. If you’ve simply…

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I own guns. I’ve had some decent training, but it was a while back. I don’t practice frequently. When I do, it tends to be with a favored few firearms. I haven’t rehearsed clearing a room or firing while “moving in a highly dynamic manner” in ages. Nor do I regularly practice things like shooting with partially obscured vision or slippery hands.

According to certain persons (self-styled experts), this makes me an “irresponsible and incompetent” gun owner.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m not opposed to great training or steady practice. On the contrary. If you have the time, money, need or inclination to train like a pro (and given that we’re meeting here in S.W.A.T. Magazine, there’s a good chance you do), more power to you. We need people like you.

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It took a long time spent carrying a gun and a badge for me to figure out the secret of reaching that state of “conscious competence” regarding tactical operations: admit your mistakes.

This came to mind today when another officer wanted to meet me immediately following a burglary-in-progress run. I had arrived within a minute of the call and took up a position to wait for backup. As the previous shift had started with a serious stabbing on what was my first day back from vacation, a thick cloud of foreboding descended as I decided that this too would undoubtedly turn into something “interesting.”

Our Chief of Police, deputy chief, and the local school’s Chief of Police arrived shortly thereafter as backup, solidifying my conviction that the Fates were against me and bad things were imminent. They’re all good guys, but they operate on carpet, while my normal work environments are ramshackle trailers, rundown apartments, and burglary-in-progress calls.

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Just look at you—packing a great gun, been to dozens of classes, got a highly tactical backpack covered in cool morale patches and, best of all, you really know how to “talk the talk.”

But I wonder: Can you “do it”?

Get your mind out of the gutter. I mean, do you possess the internal fortitude to commit violent and wholly unpleasant acts upon an adversary who means you serious bodily harm or death?

I know the answer: “Of course!” with at least a couple of extra exclamation points. After all, you’ve talked about it, trained for it and geared up appropriately so there won’t be a moment’s hesitation when it’s time to act decisively.

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