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As it turns out, “3” is Reed Knight III, or Trey as he’s more commonly known, and is the son of the owner and founder of Knight’s Armament Company (KAC), located in Titusville, Florida.

Right side of KAC SR15-E3 carbine as outfited by author for class

Knight’s Armament should need no introduction to recent veterans or aficionados of the platform, as it is the maker of the railed forend found on current issue U.S. Army M4s and USMC M16s.

Knight’s was the originator of the railed forend and is still the current supplier to the military, having sold over 500,000 to the U.S. government.

Trey was a man on a mission—to announce and promote Knight’s revived interest in the commercial firearms market. Trey had his work cut out for him, as over the years Knight’s has gained a reputation for turning a somewhat cold shoulder to the commercial firearms and accessories market. Fans of Knight’s will tell you that this was due to their being overwhelmed with military orders, while detractors say that they “just didn’t care.” Whatever the case, Trey was, and is, setting out to change that perception and was also announcing the commercial release of the new Knight’s Armament SR-15 E3, Knight’s newest version of the AR-15 carbine.

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Guns are like politicians. You hope you get a straight shooter, but you never really know what’s going on inside. It’s a coin toss as to which is worse—a rotten politician or an unreliable firearm, because either way you’re screwed. So while a gun is manmade and will therefore break sooner or later, until the actual moment of mechanical failure, a firearm has to work flawlessly every single time. If it doesn’t, it is unreliable—period. If it malfunctions once out…

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Well, I hope you’re happy: the EMP event has finally occurred, widespread looting and race wars have started, zombies have risen from the grave, Canada has invaded the U.S., dogs and cats are living together in sin, and your mother-in-law just announced she’s moving in for six months. It’s time to bug out. You quickly but carefully gather up all your supplies, medications, communications gear, assorted family members and lesser animals, a sack full of gold sovereigns, and enough firepower…

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Whether formally declared by our “leaders” or not, make no mistake that the world is at war. Police officers have been assassinated while sitting in their patrol cars, and publishers have been murdered for having the audacity to print a caricature. And race baiters continue to drive a wedge between private citizens and peace officers while padding their own checkbooks. While the mainstream media was oh so politically correct, lumping all the gatherings together as demonstrations, there were also riots—and…

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Bad advice is replete throughout the shooting industry. I caution individuals not to adhere to advice rendered by those not qualified to do so. This would seem to follow along the lines of common sense in just about any profession one could envision. Yet it does not seem to be the case when it comes to tactics, shooting techniques and, more importantly, the application of deadly force itself. I have been in this game for some time now. I have…

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The mind boggles. A recent “news” article claimed that so-called sovereign citizens may now be the most dangerous potential terrorist threat in the United States.

Sovereign citizens? Those guys who refuse to license their vehicles or themselves? Those guys who get bothered when a courtroom flag has gold fringe? Those guys who believe that if they don’t allow their name to be written in all caps, the federal government can’t control them? Those throwbacks to the 1990s? Those people who occasionally win in court, mostly because judges toss their cases out rather than sit listening to their endless obscure legalistic arguments? Sovereign citizens are now a bigger threat to the U.S. than Islamist fanatics?

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Almost 30 years ago, my wife and I were visited by her then 66-year-old father. As a young Marine, he had served in the Pacific in World War II. Among his decorations were a Navy Cross, Silver Star, and Purple Heart.

On the second day of his visit, he asked me if I would take him shooting, telling me he had brought his pistol with him on the bus and he needed some practice. His once nice neighborhood in Southern California had deteriorated, taken over by gangs and crack dealers on every corner. But it was his home, and he stubbornly refused to move.

When we arrived at the range, I was busy laying out my cool guns, which I was sure would impress him, when he produced a Raven Arms .25 Auto. I gently chided him about his “mouse gun” and made a comment to the effect of, “Don’t you know that if you shoot someone with it and they find out, they will be very upset?”

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I am the bullet—and I have no conscience.

You will treat me with respect because, once I leave, you have no control over my actions. Once I’m gone, I will do as I please, governed only by the laws of physics. And the next time you see me, I will have done my work, bringing on your life a potential gamut of emotions ranging from pleasure, satisfaction and exhilaration to anger, pain, grief and regret.

Use me wisely and with discretion, for I can snuff out the flame of a king’s life as easily as I can bring delight to a ten-year-old’s face by recording for posterity a first bullseye on a humble paper target.

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